Carpeted Bathroom floors had to go!

This homeowner took very good care of their home, but after 25 years some changes are due.Blue carpet, blue sink, tub & shower had to go!

The home is a modern design with tall angled ceilings.  By adding soffits, we were able to add character and make the room feel less open without losing all of the ceiling height.

The most interesting feature we found was the toilet sitting out in the open, just inside the door to the bathroom.  We were able to use all of the existing plumbing in the remodel, enclosed the toilet in its own compartment and gave the homeowners moreUpdate after 25 years storage space with updated features and looks.

We gutted the bathroom, replaced the original shower with a toilet compartment, added a linen cabinet, replaced the over-sized blue bathtub with a smaller jetted tub and a large walk-in shower with multiple shower heads and a seat.  Of course, the carpet was replaced with a field tile.  We added more cabinetry and you can see that we used one color for the base and another for the upper accent cabinet.  All of the trim was painted to match the upper cabinet.

Because of the soffit over the sink area and enclosing the shower with a ceiling, the room doesn’t feel soooo tall and expansive.

The homeowners love their rain shower head, and the kids don’t want to use their own bathroom, even though it was recently remodeled as well!

To see more pictures, visit the album on our Facebook page, and give us a “like” if you haven’t already!

Let us know if we can help you update your outdated kitchen or bath!

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Decks can wear out

If not properly treated and sealed decks can wear out.

We demolished this deck and replaced it with new boards and design as well.  Since it was a duplex, both neighbors agreed to completing a similar design.  We used cedar for the material. A bit more expensive than treated, but the product seems to be more durable.  It still requires care annually.See the before and after pics.

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The neighbors had problems with birds nesting underneath the deck. CD’s spinning on strings, screening, and windchimes did nothing to dissuade the birds from finding a new home, but the new screens and doors did the trick. DSCF2258 IMG_3796

 

 

 

 

 

 

We gave them matching deck sizes that gave them more square footage than they originally had on their upper decks. If they wanted to coffee clatch from their own decks, they wouldn’t have to worry about falling over the edge to speak to each other.

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With a great walk-out space and no neighbors currently, this is a great way for everyone to enjoy their outdoors time! IMG_4384 IMG_4382

Going up instead of out

This family needed to expand their living space.  They lived in an established city neighborhood.  There was no room to go out because of lot restrictions, but they could go up.

We removed the roof and added the shell of the second story while the family lived in the first floor.  Take a look at the before and after and some of the rooms once completed.

Deck – composite or not

A recent article by Gene and Katie Hamilton from Do It Yourself or Not? prompted this opinion.

First off, composite decking materials are supposed to be “maintenance free”.  Nothing is ever maintenance free, but composite deck material is very close.  Power wash it a couple times a year to remove dirt and residue and it will look wonderful for many years.

Material cost over treated or cedar is to be expected at the high end of the spectrum, but the lack of annual maintenance material cost is well worth the initial expense.

In the DIYORNOT article the authors indicated that you could purchase Trex decking for a 300 square foot

English: This is a picture of New-Tech brand w...
Plastic composite, a type of engineered wood. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

ground level deck and fasteners for $2600, install it yourself and save 29% in labor charges over the $3651 contractor charge. We think the material cost is low compared to a smaller project we have just recently completed.

Several questions you have to ask yourself:

  1. Do you have the right tools?
  2. Do you have the extra time?
  3. Will you pass inspection? (oh – did you get a permit?)
  4. Will you order materials properly? (have enough without ordering too much extra)
  5. Will your sanity be in check when you are complete?

Do it yourself projects are really great if you have skills, patience and understanding.  Sometimes it is best to hire a professional to save you stress and anxiety, and in the long run, often, money.

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